Dark Days for White Pines / Des jours sombres pour le pin blanc

Version française ci-dessous

Dark Days for White Pines

Given white pine’s ecological, economic, and cultural importance, it’s deeply troubling that it is in the grip of a recently emerged and puzzling decline throughout its range south of the border. We should expect big changes in the health of Canada’s white pines going forward, and be ready to employ new management practices to meet the challenge.

A wide array of foliar diseases, as well as a tiny scale insect and a fungus that attacks trunks and branches are involved in what can only be described as an historic plague of white pines. These agents are all native and have never before caused damage to healthy trees – it’s as if mice suddenly began to prey on full-grown livestock. We are looking at new, bizarre behaviours.

The causal agent is not a fungus or insect, however: this forest epidemic is entirely due to climate change (1). The shift in our weather patterns these past few decades has done a number on forest health. Frequent severe droughts (e.g., 2012, 2016, 2018, 2020) have made trees weakener and more vulnerable to secondary agents. On top of that, unusually warm, wet springs /early summers (e.g., 2011, 2013, 2017, 2019) have been ideal for fungi to invade and infect needles, starting in the lower canopies and spreading up trees due to rain splash.

Nicholas Brazee, an Extension plant pathologist with the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, says “…an increase in temperature and precipitation from May – July has helped to fuel the WPND epidemic. It is believed that the issues facing eastern white pine will only continue, but management options do exist to help improve the health and vigor of stressed white pines.” (2)

At least six fungi are known to cause a constellation of symptoms in what is being called white pine needle disease or WPND (3). The mix of pathogens varies from site to site, but Lecanosticta acicula (brown spot blight) and Septorioides blight are the most prevalent agents destroying needles. Caliciopsis trunk canker and white-pine bast scale lead to further weakening and decline of white pines.

Although WPND symptoms in the northeastern U.S. were noted as early as 2005, it was not until about 2010 that it was recognised as a serious emerging problem. By 2018, stands of wan, sickly white pine were everywhere in the Northeast.

Once infected by WPND, needles turn yellow the following April and May, and they become brown and drop off from mid-June to late July. Premature needle loss deprives trees of nitrogen they’d normally be able to withdraw from needles in the fall. Also, the current year’s growth is stunted and sparce, leaving pines with very little photosynthetic base. By the second or third year, resin droplets can be seen along the trunks of infected pines, a nonspecific mark of advanced stress known as resinosis.

As pines are being left denuded by foliar pathogens, tiny, black, oval-shaped insects are robbing sap from the outer layers of phloem (bast) of twigs and branches. With their siphon-like mouthpart called a stylet, hordes of native white-pine bast scales puncture the bark of white pines. By themselves they only slightly weaken the trees, but they add one more stress at a time when pines are already hammered by WPND. Furthermore, their feeding wounds are entry points for a weak perennial fungus known as Caliciopsis canker.

Caliciopsis invades thin-barked areas of branches and trunks, and the resultant pitch oozing looks a bit like an early white-pine blister-rust infection. Another symptom is heavy roughening of bark just below branch whorls. The eyelash-like fruiting bodies of Caliciopsis canker can be seen year-round. Spores mature in late winter and early spring, and are spread by wind and rain. The disease is worse in dense stands and /or on suppressed understory trees. Increased sunlight might help mitigate Caliciopsis infections.

According to a recent article in The Canadian Journal of Forest Research, damage from Caliciopsis was present in just over a third of Canadian white pine lumber in 2018. Affected trees lost nearly 40 percent of their value (4).

Research scientists and foresters with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) said in 2022 that infected white pine stands down there had an average live-crown ratio of 26%, below the widely accepted minimum value of 30%, and well under the 60% minimum suggested for urban trees. Crown transparency was 53%, in contrast with 15-25% historically seen in healthy stands. The NYSDEC also found white pine regeneration was “poor” at 57% of the plots sampled (5).

On the plus side, the scant foliage remaining on white pines becomes more efficient at photosynthesis. The trade-off is that basal-area growth declined by 40-70 percent, which is consistent with reports from other states. Overall mortality on New York State sample plots was reported to be low, at least on good soils.

That said, I saw extensive dieback along NY State Route 30 below Malone (south of Pointe-Lalonde, QC) as far back as 2012. A dash-cam video sent to me last year shows tens of kilometres of dead white pines along US I-87 about two hours south of the U.S.-Canada border crossing at Champlain.

The fact that WPND began earlier in the Mid-Atlantic region suggests that beyond warm, wet early-season weather, there may be a temperature threshold that plays a role in triggering WPND. In 2012, when symptoms had just begun to get the attention of land mangers and government in the Northeast, WPND was severe enough in Virginia and West Virginia that a 5-year study was initiated involving federal and state agencies (6).

White pine mortality in stands greatly affected by WPND was found to be 20% in larger diameter classes, and 30% among trees 4-8 inches diameter. This compares to historic baseline WP mortality of 12-14%.  To quote from the study, “If these trends continue over time, white pine abundance or sustainability could eventually be compromised as mature trees gradually die and fewer cohorts of young trees are available to replace them.”

Land managers can thin white pine stands to expedite needle drying and reduce competition for water, nutrients and light. Sources agree that fungicides are neither effective nor practical against WPND and Caliciopsis, but that affected stands may get a boost from modest nitrogen applications.

As far as I can tell, WPND and associated WP decline is not on the radar of many people here at this time. As temperatures rise, WPND is moving northward – we can’t say when it’ll arrive in Canada, but it will. Indeed, I’ve seen what looks like WPND on scattered white pines in the greater Gatineau – Ottawa area. The Extension service of the various states where WPND is an issue are engaged in research that may ultimately benefit us here. In the meantime, Extension bulletins are a great resource. If you aren’t finding enough material, please let me know and I’ll try to help. For details on thinning WP stands, contact your local professional forester.

 


Footnotes:

(1) Wyka, Stephen A. et al, “Emergence of white pine needle damage in the northeastern United States is associated with changes in pathogen pressure in response to climate change” Global Change Biology 2017 Jan;23(1):394-405. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27196816/

(2) Brazee, Nicholas J., University of Massachusetts Amherst Center for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment bulletin “Dieback of Eastern White Pine” (2018)

https://ag.umass.edu/landscape/fact-sheets/dieback-of-eastern-white-pine

(3) Cancelliere, Jessica and Cole, Rob, “White Pine Decline” New York State Conservationist, June 2019, pp. 29-31 https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/administration_pdf/0619consmag4web.pdf

(4) Costanza, Kara K.L. et al, “Economic implications of a native tree disease, Caliciopsis canker, on the white pine (Pinus strobus) lumber industry in the northeastern United States,” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Volume 49, Number 5, 09 January 2019 https://doi.org/10.1139/cjfr-2018-0380

(5) Cancelliere, Jessica and Cole, Rob, “New York Forest Conditions and White Pine Management” (2022). UNH Cooperative Extension. https://scholars.unh.edu/extension/1303

(6) Asaro, Christopher et al, “Mortality of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) in association with a novel scale insect-pathogen complex in Virginia and West Virginia” Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 423, 1 September 2018, Pages 37-48 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378112717315645


 

Written by: Paul Hetzler, CIF-IFC Ottawa Valley Section member (Paul Hetzler is an ISA Certified Arborist and a former Cornell Extension educator)
Date posted: August 28, 2023

 

****

Des jours sombres pour le pin blanc

Compte tenu de l’importance écologique, économique et culturelle du pin blanc, il est profondément troublant de constater qu’il est en proie à un déclin récent et déroutant dans l’ensemble de son aire de répartition au sud de la frontière. Nous devons nous attendre à de grands changements dans la santé des pins blancs du Canada à l’avenir et être prêts à utiliser de nouvelles pratiques de gestion pour relever le défi.

Un large éventail de maladies foliaires, ainsi qu’une minuscule cochenille et un champignon qui s’attaque aux troncs et aux branches sont impliqués dans ce qui ne peut être décrit que comme un fléau historique pour les pins blancs. Ces agents sont tous indigènes et n’ont jamais causé de dommages à des arbres sains auparavant – c’est comme si des souris se mettaient soudainement à s’attaquer à du bétail adulte. Nous observons des comportements nouveaux et bizarres.

L’agent causal n’est cependant pas un champignon ou un insecte : cette épidémie forestière est entièrement due au changement climatique (1). La modification de nos conditions météorologiques au cours des dernières décennies a eu des répercussions sur la santé des forêts. Les sécheresses sévères et fréquentes (2012, 2016, 2018, 2020) ont affaibli les arbres et les ont rendus plus vulnérables aux agents secondaires. En outre, les printemps et les étés exceptionnellement chauds et humides (p. ex. 2011, 2013, 2017, 2019) ont été propices à l’invasion et à l’infection des aiguilles par des champignons, en commençant par la partie inférieure du feuillage et en se propageant vers le haut des arbres sous l’effet des éclaboussures de la pluie.

Nicholas Brazee, phytopathologiste à l’université du Massachusetts à Amherst, explique que “l’augmentation des températures et des précipitations de mai à juillet a contribué à alimenter l’épidémie du déclin”. On pense que les problèmes auxquels est confronté le pin blanc ne feront que s’aggraver, mais il existe des options de gestion qui permettent d’améliorer la santé et la vigueur des pins blancs stressés.” (2)

Au moins six champignons sont connus pour provoquer une constellation de symptômes dans ce que l’on appelle la maladie des aiguilles du pin blanc (ou la MAPB) (3). Le mélange d’agents pathogènes varie d’un site à l’autre, mais Lecanosticta acicula (tache brune) et Septorioides sont les agents les plus répandus qui détruisent les aiguilles. Le chancre du tronc du Caliciopsis et la cochenille du liber du pin blanc entraînent un affaiblissement et un déclin supplémentaires des pins blancs.

Bien que les symptômes de la MAPB dans le nord-est des États-Unis aient été observés dès 2005, ce n’est que vers 2010 qu’il a été reconnu comme un problème émergent sérieux. En 2018, les peuplements de pins blancs maigres et malades étaient omniprésents dans le nord-est.

Une fois infectées par la MAPB, les aiguilles jaunissent en avril et mai, puis brunissent et tombent de la mi-juin à la fin juillet. La perte prématurée des aiguilles prive les arbres de l’azote qu’ils pourraient normalement extraire des aiguilles à l’automne. En outre, la croissance de l’année en cours est rabougrie et clairsemée, ce qui laisse aux pins une base photosynthétique très réduite. Dès la deuxième ou troisième année, des gouttelettes de résine peuvent être observées le long des troncs des pins infectés, une marque non spécifique de stress avancé connue sous le nom de résinose.

Tandis que les pathogènes foliaires dénudent les pins, de minuscules insectes noirs de forme ovale volent la sève des couches extérieures du phloème (liber) des rameaux et des branches. Avec leur partie buccale en forme de siphon appelée stylet, des hordes de cochenilles du liber du pin blanc indigène perforent l’écorce des pins blancs. En elles-mêmes, elles n’affaiblissent que légèrement les arbres, mais elles ajoutent un stress supplémentaire à une époque où les pins sont déjà affaiblis. De plus, les blessures qu’elles causent sont des points d’entrée pour un champignon vivace faible connu sous le nom de chancre de Caliciopsis.

Le Caliciopsis envahit les zones à écorce fine des branches et des troncs, et le suintement de poix qui en résulte ressemble un peu à une infection précoce de rouille vésiculeuse du pin blanc. Un autre symptôme est une forte rugosité de l’écorce juste en dessous des verticilles des branches. Les fructifications du chancre de Caliciopsis, qui ressemblent à des cils, sont visibles tout au long de l’année. Les spores mûrissent à la fin de l’hiver et au début du printemps et se propagent par le vent et la pluie. La maladie est plus grave dans les peuplements denses et/ou sur les arbres du sous-étage qui ont été supprimés. L’augmentation de l’ensoleillement peut contribuer à atténuer les infections de Caliciopsis.

Selon un article récent paru dans The Canadian Journal of Forest Research, les dommages causés par Caliciopsis étaient présents dans un peu plus d’un tiers du bois d’œuvre de pin blanc canadien en 2018. Les arbres affectés ont perdu près de 40 % de leur valeur (4).

Les chercheurs et les forestiers du département de la conservation de l’environnement de l’État de New York (NYSDEC) ont déclaré en 2022 que les peuplements de pins blancs infectés de cet État présentaient un rapport couronne vivante moyen de 26 %, inférieur à la valeur minimale largement acceptée de 30 %, et bien en deçà du minimum de 60 % suggéré pour les arbres urbains. La transparence du houppier était de 53 %, alors qu’elle était de 15 à 25 % dans les peuplements sains. Le NYSDEC a également constaté que la régénération du pin blanc était “médiocre” dans 57 % des parcelles échantillonnées (5).

D’un point de vue positif, le maigre feuillage restant sur les pins blancs devient plus efficace en termes de photosynthèse. En contrepartie, la croissance de la surface terrière a diminué de 40 à 70 %, ce qui correspond aux rapports d’autres États. La mortalité globale sur les parcelles d’échantillonnage de l’État de New York a été signalée comme étant faible, du moins sur les bons sols.

Cela dit, j’ai constaté un dépérissement important le long de la NY State Route 30 en aval de Malone (au sud de Pointe-Lalonde, au Québec) dès 2012. Une vidéo de caméra de surveillance qui m’a été envoyée l’année dernière montre des dizaines de kilomètres de pins blancs morts le long de la route américaine I-87, à environ deux heures au sud de la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Canada, à Champlain.

Le fait que la maladie ait commencé plus tôt dans la région du centre du littoral atlantique suggère qu’au-delà des conditions météorologiques chaudes et humides du début de saison, un seuil de température peut jouer un rôle dans le déclenchement du déclin. En 2012, alors que les symptômes commençaient à peine à attirer l’attention des gestionnaires de terres et des pouvoirs publics dans le nord-est, le déclin était suffisamment grave en Virginie et en Virginie-Occidentale pour qu’une étude de cinq ans soit lancée avec la participation d’agences fédérales et d’État (6).

La mortalité du pin blanc dans les peuplements fortement touchés par le déclin s’est avérée être de 20 % dans les classes de diamètre supérieures et de 30 % parmi les arbres de 4 à 8 pouces de diamètre. Ces chiffres sont à comparer à la mortalité historique du pin blanc, qui est de 12 à 14 %.  Selon l’étude, “si ces tendances se poursuivent dans le temps, l’abondance ou la durabilité du pin blanc pourraient être compromises à terme, car les arbres matures meurent progressivement et il y a moins de cohortes de jeunes arbres pour les remplacer”.

Les gestionnaires des terres peuvent éclaircir les peuplements de pins blancs pour accélérer le séchage des aiguilles et réduire la concurrence pour l’eau, les nutriments et la lumière. Les sources s’accordent à dire que les fongicides ne sont ni efficaces ni pratiques contre le WPND et le Caliciopsis, mais que les peuplements affectés peuvent bénéficier d’un coup de pouce grâce à de modestes applications d’azote.

Pour autant que je sache, la MAPB et le déclin du pin blanc qui lui est associé ne sont pas sur le radar de beaucoup de gens ici pour le moment. À mesure que les températures augmentent, le WPND se déplace vers le nord – nous ne pouvons pas dire quand il arrivera au Canada, mais il y arrivera. En effet, j’ai vu ce qui ressemble au WPND sur des pins blancs éparpillés dans la région de Gatineau – Ottawa. Les services de vulgarisation des différents États où le WPND est un problème mènent des recherches qui pourraient nous être utiles ici. En attendant, les bulletins de vulgarisation constituent une excellente ressource. Si vous ne trouvez pas suffisamment de matériel, veuillez m’en faire part et j’essaierai de vous aider. Pour plus de détails sur l’éclaircissement des peuplements de pin blanc, contactez votre forestier professionnel local.


Notes de bas de page

(1) Wyka, Stephen A. et al, “Emergence of white pine needle damage in the northeastern United States is associated with changes in pathogen pressure in response to climate change” Global Change Biology 2017 Jan;23(1):394-405. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27196816/

(2) Brazee, Nicholas J., University of Massachusetts Amherst Center for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment bulletin “Dieback of Eastern White Pine” (2018) https://ag.umass.edu/landscape/fact-sheets/dieback-of-eastern-white-pine

(3) Cancelliere, Jessica and Cole, Rob, “White Pine Decline” New York State Conservationist, June 2019, pp. 29-31 https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/administration_pdf/0619consmag4web.pdf

(4) Costanza, Kara K.L. et al, “Economic implications of a native tree disease, Caliciopsis canker, on the white pine (Pinus strobus) lumber industry in the northeastern United States,” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Volume 49, Number 5, 09 January 2019 https://doi.org/10.1139/cjfr-2018-0380

(5) Cancelliere, Jessica and Cole, Rob, “New York Forest Conditions and White Pine Management” (2022). UNH Cooperative Extension. https://scholars.unh.edu/extension/1303

(6) Asaro, Christopher et al, “Mortality of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) in association with a novel scale insect-pathogen complex in Virginia and West Virginia” Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 423, 1 September 2018, Pages 37-48 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378112717315645

 


Rédigé par : Paul Hetzler, membre de la section de la vallée de l’Outaouais du CIF-IFC (Paul Hetzler est un arboriste certifié par l’ISA et un ancien éducateur de Cornell Extension).

Date de publication : 28 août 2023